Posts tagged ‘Bar Harbor’

July 30, 2012

Great Maine Breakfast Reflects Logging Camp Past

Maine logging camp cooks

The standards for a great breakfast in Maine are high, hearkening back to the logging camps.

Lumbermen would refuse to work if they didn’t like the food.  The output of the cooks, whose reputations grew among workers in the Maine woods, was as much a factor as pay in selecting where to work.

Camp cook culinary renown grew with mastery of breads, pastries, pie, and, of course, baked beans – which hearken back even further to Maine’s Native Americans, the Wabanaki, who prepared them with maple syrup and bits of venison or other meat.

That tradition of a hearty breakfast is alive and well today for visitors to Acadia National Park at Jeannie’s at 15 Cottage Street in Bar Harbor, which serves The Great Maine Breakfast.

It’s hard to resist the namesake breakfast on your first visit.  The delicious homemade baked beans come with three eggs, grilled ham, home fries, toast, and a buttermilk pancake.

Great Maine Breakfast

Of course, if your preference goes more toward black beans, you might opt for the three-egg Spanish omelet with provolone cheese. Topped with a very fresh and spicy salsa, it’s also served with home fries and homemade toast.

Jeannie's spicy Spanish omelet

No Bar Harbor breakfast spot is popular – and, believe me, Jeannie’s is – if it doesn’t offer some version of eggs with lobster.  Jeannie’s lobster specialty is an omelet filled with that iconic crustacean and topped with a creamy Mornay cheese sauce.

If you have a sweet tooth, you won’t be disappointed.  You can choose from blueberry pancakes or French toast stuffed with cream cheese and jam.  Jeannie’s is also known for its strawberry rhubarb fruit spread, which is packaged with pancake mixes, as a great gift to take to those who had to stay home.

Vegans can relax with vegan oatmeal and walnut pancakes topped with a warm, savory homemade applesauce.  If you’re a vegetarian who loves tofu, as my daughter does, go for the scrambled eggs with spiced tofu, peppers, and onions.  It’s also topped with that deliciously fresh homemade salsa.

Jeannie's Cottage Street Bar Harbor

There’s nothing fancy about Jeannie’s, which doesn’t take reservations.  But friendly and fast service will get you out early, as well fueled as any Maine woodsman, to tackle your hiking trail or carriage road in Acadia National Park.

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Best Bar Harbor Breakfasts: 2 Cats

Tips for Kid-Friendly Restaurants in Bar Harbor

Best Restaurants in Bar Harbor – From a New Yorker’s Point-of-View

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July 21, 2012

Beyond Arrowheads and Animal Bones at the Abbe Museum in Bar Harbor

I’m a bona fide nerd and proud of it.  But, I realize that what appeals to me may not similarly captivate others, so, at least in my capacity as a blogger, I urge active use of the “Comment” function.  If something I found fascinating on Mount Desert Island was utterly boring to you, please let me – and our readers – know.  Comment.

With this strong sense of self-awareness, I visited the Abbe Museum in downtown Bar Harbor recently.  I know that high on everyone’s agenda for a visit to Acadia National Park are a trip to Cadillac Mountain, bike riding around Eagle Lake, tea at Jordan Pond House, and photographing the Bass Harbor Lighthouse.  But what are the alternatives on a rainy day in Bar Harbor?  Everyone wants to know.

It was chilly and drizzling rain, so we decided to visit The Abbe Museum.

Abbe Museum Downtown Bar Harbor

The museum actually has two sites – the original trailside museum at Sieur de Monts Spring and the newer home for the ever-expanding collection, which opened at 26 Mount Desert Street in downtown Bar Harbor in 2001.  The mission of both is to showcase the history and cultures of Maine’s native people, the Wabanaki, through changing exhibitions, special events, teacher workshops, and craft workshops for children and adults.

As we entered the renovated 1893 landmark, which has spacious, contemporary galleries, I was struck by a family with two young boys.  They had just finished an engaging conversation with the museum’s only docent and were enthusiastically referring to scavenger hunt master sheets as they pored over display cabinets of arrowheads, animal bones, and early tools.Mother and Son at Abbe Museum

As directed by the docent, I proceeded to a timeline, which was the entry point for the current major exhibition, Indians & Rusticators: Wabanakis and Summer Visitors on Mount Desert Island 1840s-1920s, which will end its run in December.  It immediately captured my imagination, because I live in Somesville, the first settlement on Mount Desert Island, founded in 1791.

There was an amazing handwritten piece by the great granddaughter of Daniel Somes about the family’s generosity in allowing the Indians to camp on the perimeters of “their” land at no cost; yet she herself yearned to be an Indian.

A basket from that period of the first settlers was the first among many.  The Abbe Museum has the largest and best documented collection of Maine Indian basketry.Basket exhibit Abbe Museum Bar Harbor

The exhibition’s timeline continued with the subsequent “discovery” of the island by artists starting with Thomas Cole and including Frederic Church and the other Hudson School painters.  The next period of Mount Desert history was the “development” of the island by rusticators, the wealthy who built massive cottages in Bar Harbor.

A while back I had learned that the first guide book to Mount Desert Island, which was very much a hiking guide, was written by a woman, Claire Barnes Martin, in 1877.  Since I’m an enthusiastic hiker, it was cool to see an original print of the book, along with a pair of women’s boots that would have been worn on these hikes.Lady's hiking boots Abbe Museum

Most fascinating was the demonstration of entrepreneurism of the Wabanakis throughout these periods.  The Indians came back to the island for the summer season and opened up “businesses” in Bar Harbor.  Here they offered summer rusticators fishing trips, paddling lessons, and activities for their children.  They even provided fortune telling.Abbe Museum Bar HarborAbbe Museum canoe

I left the museum wishing I had more time to spend there, but we had made plans for an early dinner at Thurston’s (one of my favorite restaurants on Mount Desert Island) in Bass Harbor with friends.

Later at Thurston’s, I recognized the father of the two little boys I had seen in the museum and I greeted him, “I saw you at the Abbe Museum today.  Your boys were really well behaved.”  “No,” he said.  “They are usually a lot more active.  But they just loved that scavenger hunt.”

So, don’t take it from me.  Those are two strong recommendations for the Abbe Museum as a great thing to do when it rains during a visit to Acadia National Park.

RELATED STORIES:

10 Things to Do with Your Kids on a Rainy Day in Acadia National Park

Tips for Kid-Friendly Restaurants in Bar Harbor

14 Ways to Save Money on a Family Trip to Bar Harbor and Acadia National Park

June 26, 2012

14 Ways for Families to Save on a Vacation to Bar Harbor and Acadia National Park

Image

Acadia National Park is one of the most popular national parks in the U.S.  Attracted by the vistas of where the mountains meet the sea, over 2,300,000 people visited Acadia in 2011, making it the ninth most-visited national park.

Acadia is also a great vacation option for families on a budget.  With just a little planning, you can enjoy great scenery, restaurants, and outdoor activities – without a credit card bill the next month that takes all the fun away.

Here’s how.

1.  Rent a cottage so that you don’t have to eat every meal out.  There’s a wide array of rental options available through Mount Desert Island real estate agents or online.

2.  Better still, camp!  Sites at Blackwoods and Seawall, the two National Park sites on Mount Desert Island, are within a 10-minute walk from the ocean and only cost $20 a night.

3.  Take advantage of free ranger-led programs.   You  don’t have to be a camper to join the evening festivities at the campgrounds,  which are very entertaining, especially for kids.  Other programs take place throughout the park.

Ranger talk at Seawall Campground

4.  If  you’re 62 or older, get a $10 lifetime entrance pass.  The regular pass to enter Acadia  National Park is only $20, but seniors can buy discounted passes at the Hulls Cove Visitor Center that they can use at more than 2,000 federal recreation sites.

Hulls Cove entrance fees

5.  Bring  your own bikes.  It may be inconvenient to schlepp them,  but Acadia’s carriage roads offer 45 miles of car-free biking great for  the whole family around lakes, beside babbling brooks, and up  mountains.  If you want to bike more than once – and you will – renting for a family can get pricey, with rates running around $22 a day for adults and $15-18 for kids.

boy biking in Acadia National Park

6.  Stock  up at supermarkets to avoid paying higher prices in  small specialty markets.  There are large Shaw’s and Hannaford’s in Ellsworth, where we often stop.  Hannaford’s also has a large store on Cottage Street in Bar Harbor.

7.  But bring staples from home.  Pack just a few of the items you buy in bulk at home (tea bags, lemonade packets, and sweetener) so that you won’t have to stock up and then waste what you don’t use.

8.  Gas up off island.  If you forget, don’t worry.  The Somesville  One-Stop/Mobil, conveniently located right in the center of Mount Desert  Island, has great prices.  However,  prices fluctuate significantly around the island.  For example,we’ve seen prices 11 cents higher in downtown Bar Harbor.

9.  If  you’re renting a house or cottage, look for one that offers a kayak you can  use.  Tandem kayaks run $35 for three hours.  Depending on your  family size and how long you want to explore, this could add up.  Remember, places like Great Long Pond and Jordan Pond (below) offer hours of exploration and relaxation.

Kayaking Bubbles

10.  Take the Island Explorer bus around the island and save on gas.  The island is big.  You can put 130 miles on in 4 days.  And, remember, taking the bus is a great, safe way for teenagers to show a little independence and get around the island themselves.

11.  Explore options for educational activities.  Kids love touch tanks as a way to learn more about lobsters and sea life.  As wonderful as they are,  boat cruises can run as high as $43 per person.  A less expensive option is an oceanarium.

Touch tanks with lobsters

12.  Substitute activities like tide pooling as a no-cost alternative to movies or shopping.  Kids love climbing the rocks around Bass Harbor lighthouse.   Blueberry picking is permitted throughout the park.  Another great activity is to walk across the sand bar Bar Harbor to Bar Island while it’s low tide.  Last time I did this I saw a baby seal.

Child tide pooling Acadia National Park

13.  Cook  out ocean-side at one of Acadia’s great picnic areas, such as Seawall (below) or Pretty Marsh,  with grills provided by the park service.

Seawall Mount Desert Island Maine

14.  When you finally splurge on lobster (as you should!), choose  a lobster pound that offers options for your kids if they prefer grilled chicken or even PB&J.

Maine lobster dinner

RELATED STORIES:

Best Easy Hikes for Kids

22 Things to Do with Kids in Acadia National Park

Best Bar Harbor Restaurants for Kids

 

August 28, 2011

Top Artisanal Ice Cream in America Is Just Across the Village Green in Bar Harbor

President Obama chose coconut.  My husband blueberry.  And I opted for two scoops – kahlua chip and salt caramel. 

I’ll never feel the same about Haagen-Daz again.

Apparently I’m not alone in my assessment of MDI Ice Cream.  This is what all of Mount Desert’s best restaurants – including Red Sky, Havana, Café This Way, and Fathom – choose to pair with their homemade puddings and blueberry pies. Red Sky, in fact, has built a banana split with bruleed banana, maple-candied almonds and sun-dried cherries around three flavors of MDI Ice Cream.  When Downeast Magazine published their itinerary of what to do in Bar Harbor, their late-night recommendation for the active traveler was a visit to MDI Ice Cream.  And this summer both Food and Wine Magazine and Mother Earth News have included them on their lists of best artisan ice creams nationwide. 

Still, MDI Ice Cream is a low-key place that avoids sensationalism.  No lobster ice cream here.  Linda Parker founded it in 2005 in Bar Harbor, where there are now two retail shops, one on Main Street across from Havana and the other on Firefly Lane just off Main Street and across from the Village Green. After six years in Bar Harbor, she has also opened on Exchange Street in Portland.

Taking a look at their flavors, you have no trouble buying into her motto: Fearless Flavor.   Chili chocolate, blackstrap banana, candy shoppe, nectarine prosecco, nutella, mango jicama habanero, lemon basil, and cookies.  But, believe me.  They’re not weird.  They’re delicious.

Ice cream and summer vacation go together.  And, let’s face it.  You can’t take it with you.  Like the breeze on Sargent Mountain or the sound of the gulls over Bass Harbor, we’ll enjoy it while we’re here.  So, for now, move over Haagen-Daz.

Plan your trip to Bar Harbor and Acadia National Park.

July 25, 2011

Include Mount Desert’s Celebrity Barns Among “Must See” Sites Near Acadia National Park

London paparazzi have Kate Middleton.  In LA they have Lindsay Lohan.  But in Maine cameras focus on celebrity barns.

As we were driving from Somesville to Bar Harbor on Norway Drive, we passed the famous Stone Barn on Crooked Road.  A red mini-van was pulled up front, and its owners, like increasingly bold pigeons in a park, got closer and closer to the barn as they snapped away until they were right outside the barn door.

Stone Barn’s 85-year-old owner Harry Owen doesn’t seem to mind, however.  He’s proud of the 128-acre farm on Mount Desert Island that is now permanently protected against development.  “I’ve always felt I was put on earth to protect this land,” Mr. Owen told Maine Coast Heritage Trust back in 2001 when the farm became protected by a conservation easement.  The cobblestone barn, which was built in 1820, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

“To honor their historical importance and raise interest in preserving these impressive structures,” the Mount Desert Island Historical Society periodically offers guided tours of historic barns in Somesville and Bar Harbor.  Stone Barn, of course, is on the tour.  Nearby is the Peterson Barn on Norway Drive, which has also been featured.

Here is a view of the Parker Farm just outside of Somesville village from Somes Harbor.

Create your own tour to see the barns of Mount Desert Island.  Their appeal certainly extends beyond the historic.  Their simple forms attract painters and photographers, who count them among the special sights to see on Mount Desert Island.  For all of us, they link us to the land and remind us of values deep in our culture.

So, include Stone Barn on places to see when you visit Acadia National Park.  You can find more things to do by visiting OUR ACADIA.

And don’t be surprised if Harry Owen looks up from his mowing to give you a wave.

RELATED STORIES

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July 17, 2011

Bar Harbor Shopping Guide: The Best On and Off the Beaten Path

From trip mementos for yourself to special gifts for others, from the simple to the spectacular, Bar Harbor and the neighboring villages on Mount Desert Island have lots to keep shoppers entertained…at least until the skies clear and we’re back on the hiking trails. 

Cool As A Moose®

118 Main Street, Bar Harbor
288-3904

The iconic vacation souvenir is a T-shirt, and there are lots to choose from here.  Cool As A Moose even has its own line, reprieving a psychedelic design.  My favorites are downstairs in the Life is Good collection.  But why not branch out to, say, their Gluteus Maximoose boxers?

 Fiore

8 Rodick Place, Bar Harbor

801-2580

A relative newcomer to Bar Harbor , Fiore doesn’t have a shop; it’s a tasting room lined with mini stainless steel canisters of extra virgin olive oil and aged balsamic vinegars from which you sample blends and infusions of different flavors.  Then then pour and bottle it for you.  Although the traditional 18-year balsamic vinegar is most popular, I couldn’t pass up a fig-flavored balsamic.   

 Spruce & Gussy

12 Mount Desert Street, Bar Harbor

669-5309

If your tastes run more toward the contemporary, you’ll want to check out this new shop run by two local women.  They’ve brought together the work of artisans from throughout the U.S. and Mexico that convey color, craftsmanship, and whimsy.  From leather-bound journals to bibs to hand towels, something will catch your eye as an “adornment for self or space.”

 Kimball Shop & Boutique

135 Main Street, Northeast Harbor
276-3043

I can never get enough of ferns and scallop shells, so the barware, table linens, and serving pieces at the Kimball Shop hold endless appeal for me.  Furnishings range from elegant tableware to rugs and floor cloths that epitomize traditional summer style.  Their tent sale in the fall allows me to afford some of it!

 Hatched on MDI

360 Main Street, Southwest Harbor

244-9800

A native of Mount Desert Island, Heather Brown has a flourishing shop, with expanded quarters, that is as much a community center for year-round parents as it is the perfect spot to find a baby gift.  From “super cute” bathing suits to toys and books to the best Anti Bug Balm Stick by Badger, you won’t be disappointed, especially if you then pop in next door at the Quiet Side Café for a piece of blueberry pie.

Judy Taylor Studio & Gallery

1517 Tremont Road, Seal Cove.
244 5545

The western side of Mount Desert Island is blissfully undeveloped, with beautiful ponds, rolling meadows, and deep coniferous forests.  Here you can visit the studio of Maine artist Judy Taylor – by chance or appointment.  She works in oils, gouache, watercolor, and oils.  Although some formats are smaller (24 x 18”), there’s always an iconic strength in her work that makes her appealing Maine landscapes remarkably distinctive.

What else do you need to plan the perfect Maine vacation?  Whether you want tips on the best lobster pounds or kid-friendly restaurants…guides for kayaking or family rock climbing…or things to do on a rainy day, your best source is OUR ACADIA.

July 9, 2011

When the Best Maine Lobster Roll Isn’t a Roll at All

Locals can get a little cranky when you ask, “What’s the best lobster pound?” 

“A lobster is a lobster is a lobster.” 

“It takes someone with a rare talent to screw up a boiled or steamed lobster.” 

Whether or not that’s true about boiled lobster (overcooking does cause toughness), it’s certainly not the case with lobster rolls.  Granted, in Maine they all usually taste great.  However, in side-by-side comparisons, some lobster rolls do taste better than others.  Preparation of the lobster salad varies.  Freshness varies.  And some purveyors, most notably the Lobster Claw in Bar Harbor, will make you a lobster roll that features fresh, unadulterated lobster meat.  Naked, as they say.

Among the lobster pounds near Acadia National Park perhaps the biggest difference in any lobster roll is the very lack of the roll itself at Trenton Bridge Lobster Pound.  At this esteemed establishment, which has had four generations of family members working there, lobster salad is served on a dense white bread that tastes like what my mother used to bake at home.  Says Josette Pettegrow, whose parents started the business in 1956, “It’s the old-fashioned way.  It’s how my mother served lobster salad, and my grandmother before.” 

That’s the way Nancy Jenkins sees it.  Writing in the New York Times, she noted, “The lobster roll is a tradition, though not a very old one. My 75-year-old father, who has lived all his life in Maine, says he doesn’t remember eating a lobster roll until sometime after World War II.” 

So, when you visit Acadia National Park, consider trying a lobster salad sandwich at Trenton Bridge Lobster Pound.  It’s located on Route 3 just as you approach the bridge to cross over to Mount Desert Island.  You’ll see the sign and smell the smoke of the wood-fired cookers boiling the lobsters. 

For more dining options during your trip to Acadia National Park, check out the restaurant reviews at OUR ACADIA.  You’ll get tips on where to find the best crab bisque, great choices for a special evening out, and places to eat with kids.

 

July 3, 2011

5 Tips If You Want to Enjoy A Glorious Sunrise from Cadillac Mountain in Maine

Parking spaces are filling up.  People are walking purposefully, all in the same direction.  Some are carrying blankets and thermos bottles.  Is it a concert?  Theatre in the park?

No, it is sunrise on Cadillac Mountain, the first place to see sunrise in the United States.

At 1,532 feet, Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park in Maine is the highest point along the North Atlantic seaboard.  Many hiking trails converge on this mountaintop, as do bus tours.  But before dawn is a spectacular time to visit to witness the first sunrise.

Actually, Cadillac is struck by the sun’s rays before any place else only in the fall and winter.  During most of the spring and summer, that special recognition goes to Mars Hill to the northeast.  That, however, in no way diminishes the excitement of the populace who rise early on Mount Desert Island during summertime to see this spectacle of nature.

We had checked the time for sunrise on weather.com.  Fred was shocked that I actually got up at 4:30am, but I did and we jumped into the car.  The road seemed to circle endlessly as we ascended Cadillac, worried that we would miss “it.”  We moved with the crowds to the eastern side of the parking area and waited. 

As the firey orange mass rose, it brightened the purple clouds above and the dark masses of the Porcupine Islands in Frenchman Bay below.  In seconds it was morning.

If you decide to put sunrise at Cadillac on your vacation agenda, here are some tips:

  1. Check the time for sunrise and give yourself plenty of time to get up the mountain.  It takes about twenty minutes from the village of Bar Harbor.
  2. Dress warmly.  Even in August, pre-dawn is chilly and it can be windy on top of Cadillac.
  3. Bring a blanket or even chairs so that you can wait comfortably.
  4. Consider a thermos of coffee to ward off the chill.
  5. Check photography sites for tips on taking sunrise pictures.  An important tip: the color of a sunrise is far more short-lived than a sunset; the sky washes out in 30 to 45 seconds after the sun is up.

For more ideas on things to do when you visit Acadia National Park or Bar Harbor, Maine, visit OUR ACADIA.

June 29, 2011

Celebrate July 4th on Mount Desert Island: Schedule of 2011 Events in Bar Harbor

If you’re visiting Mount Desert Island on the Fourth of July, prepare to be busy.  Sure, you may start the day quietly by doing something like photographing the footbridge in Somesville.  But I bet you’ll soon become ensnared in the traditional excitement ofAmerica’s Independence Day – with a quintessential Maine twist.  Check out the schedule to see what I mean: 

6am  Blueberry Pancake Breakfast

At the Bar Harbor Athletic Field onPark Street, indulge in pancakes, blueberry or plain, and everything else that makes a great Maine breakfast. 

9am-3pm  Craft Fair

Scour the marketplace at the YMCA, 21 Park Street for jewelry, quilts, photographs, pottery, and porcelain dolls. 

10am  Independence Day Parade

“America the Beautiful” is the theme of the parade, which winds through downtown from Main Street to Cottage to Eden to Mt. Desert to Ledgelawn Avenue.

 11am  Seafood Festival

Back at the Bar Harbor Athletic Field on Park  Street enjoy lobster, mussels, corn, and strawberry shortcake. 

After the Parade, MDI YMCA Annual Lobster Races

At the Bar Harbor Athletic Field on Park Street, watch local businesses race their lobsters to benefit the MDI YMCA Scholarship Program. 

7:30-8:30pm  Bar Harbor Town Band

Enjoy a free concert on the Bar Harbor Village Green with the Town Band, a tradition for more than 100 years. 

8-9pm  Brass Venture

Move to Agamont Park for another free concert, this one by Brass Venture, a dynamic chamber ensemble. 

9:15pm (approximately)  Fireworks over Frenchman Bay

Marvel at the fireworks display on the waterfront as the Brass Venture performs Handel’s Fireworks. 

After such a fun-packed day, you’ll need to schedule some downtime at Sand Beach.  Not so quick?  Well, for more ideas on what to do during your Bar Harbor vacation, including restaurant tips, visit OUR ACADIA.

June 27, 2011

5 Best Places to Eat with Kids in Bar Harbor During a Family Vacation to Acadia National Park

The most popular section of my Web site OUR ACADIA – which is devoted to exploring, eating, and relaxing in Maine – is restaurants.  Maybe it’s because lobster, blueberry pie, and chowder are so high up on everyone’s agenda of what to do in Maine!  If you are planning a family vacation to Mount Desert Island, here are the best spots to eat with kids.

Jordan Pond House

Enjoying tea and popovers on the lawn at Jordan Pond House has been a Mount Desert Island tradition since 1870.  Located on a hill overlooking Jordan Pond and the Bubble mountains, the restaurant serves lunch, tea, and dinner. At the cross roads of hiking, biking, and sightseeing trails, the lawn is a hub of activity, so let the kids run around while your waitress puts in your order for lobster stew, Maine crab cakes, popovers, lemonade, and homemade strawberry icecream.

Thurston’s Lobster Pound

Thurston’s Lobster Pound is the real thing, serving steamed lobster, chowder, and ales from local micro-breweries in a casual setting overlooking the working lobster boats of Bass Harbor.  The folks who own Thurston’s are smart.  They keep parents happy with steamers and lobster, kids thrilled with burgers, hot dogs, and peanut butter and jelly.  A sophisticated teen who scorns seafood?  How about a grilled chicken sandwich with Boursin cheese?  And everyone will love their special blueberry spice cake.

Pat’s Pizza

After days of seafood, some families want something different.  Pat’s is particularly kid-friendly because of its varied menu.  I love their deliciously crisp pizza, but it also comes in “double dough” and gluten-free styles.  Your teenager may want a chicken caesar salad, while the little kids go for a traditional Italian dinner of baked ziti or lasagna.  Nachos and burgers are options, too.  There are so many tempting options for pizza that you may end up coming back a second time to take out.

Café This Way

If it’s going to rain, schedule a day exploring Bar Harbor that starts with a special breakfast at Café This Way.  Parents can choose among six different ways to have their Eggs Benedict or create their own omelets.  Kids love the blueberry pancakes, French toast, waffles, and Big Breakfast Sandwiches.  My husband couldn’t decide between eggs or French toast so he chose the Monte Cristo, a French toast sandwich filled with a fried egg, ham, and cheddar cheese, served with home fries and maple syrup.

Ben & Bill’s Chocolate Emporium

Summertime and candy shops just go together.  Taffy?  Lobster icecream?  From the traditional to the, well, innovative, Ben & Bill’s has it all.  You can get buttercrunch, chocolates, gummy candies, jelly beans, and homemade fudge made from a 100-year-old recipe.  If you prefer icecream, they stock 64 hard-serve flavors in summer, along with 12 flavors of gelato — all made at the shop on Main Street in Bar Harbor.  No  one leaves unhappy, including the family hound, who can get a Yellow Dog Special, a baby scoop of vanilla icecream with two dog bones.

For other ideas on what to do with kids – ranging from boat cruises to family-friendly hikes – visit OUR ACADIA’S “Kids’ Favorites.”  That’s the second most popular part of the site!